Nostalgia

All of a sudden visiting the fjäll regions became popular, though it was an exclusive experience. Not least because the ways from Stockholm or Göteborg up to the highlands are quite long.

During the 30ies and 40ies it became possible to travel to Härjedalens fjäll world for more and more nature enthusiast living in the big cities. Skarvruet got constructed at the beginning of the 1940ies as a tourist station offering accommodation to fjäll friends, skiers and hikers. Further visitors came to enjoy the fresh clean air of the fjäll world as a cure. In winter times one could go skiing and during summer one could discover the exotic fjäll world being rich in flora and fauna with its wild animals such as the reindeer and even the inspiring regional culture. Up to today Skarvruets is open for guests loving nature and silence and feeling good in the vastness of the fjäll and the wilderness.

However, you can also simply revel – it’s allowed, too. Have a seat on the cosy sun deck facing south, visit the delightful saunas: the classic big sauna with a panoramic view over the fjäll or the smaller sauna room. Or take a bath in the soothing sweet or salt water hot tubs on the sun deck.

In the early years only few came with their own cars. The most guests took the last bit from the train station by transfer. The Swedish state railway used to operate a night train to Hede. As a few may remember there had been a tourist train with sleeping waggons at the winter seasons between 1934 and 1965. Some waggons came even from Copenhagen. But the last passenger train of the Hedebanan between Sveg and Hede went in 1966. Up to today the bus is the best means of transportation to Härjedalen, unless one does not travel by car.

Of course traveling by car is the most common today. There is one last direct bus connection to Stockholm. Apart from that there goes a regional bus that has a connection to the train, though this means long traveling times. Luckily there is the possibility to travel through the close Røros airport or even through Trondheim in Norway.